Tagged: inspiration

1763_sampler

 

Sampler, Artist/maker unknown; English; 1763Silk on linen; cross, and pattern darning stitches;
14 1/4 x 13 3/4 inches (36.2 x 34.9 cm). Collection of Philadelphia Museum of Art.

1927_sampler

Sampler, made by Mary Bacon at Westtown School, Chester County, Pennsylvania;
1810; Silk and cotton on linen canvas; darning, cross and wave stitches; 7 3/4 x 7 3/4 inches (19.7 x 19.7 cm). Collection of Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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PMSCame across this very special linen sheet in the V&A collection:

Around the edges of the sheet are six sets of initials embroidered in pink silk, four of which bear dates ranging from 1786 to 1900. According to the note that accompanied this anonymous donation these initials refer to the individuals who were covered with the sheet when laid out after death.

 

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In place of going to Poland, I’ve been digging around looking for images that might allow me to date the two kilims I brought home with me from Krakow last time I was there. Amazing to see these Polish kilims being woven on upright looms.

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This stunning quilt has recently joined my collection, found in Southwestern Ontario. It came with the provenance of being Mennonite, and judging by the number of times it’s been repaired, I reckon it’s around 90 years old.

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Similar to my disbelief about acquiring a Peter Collingwood macrogauze is my amazement that a Salish blanket by Adeline Lorenzetto now belongs to me. Adeline Lorenzetto, along with Mary Peters, were central to the Salish weaving revival in the early 1960s and established the Salish Weavers Guild in Sardis, BC in 1971. Both women started weaving based on recorded descriptions and the study of existing blankets still belonging to other Salish families. Oliver Wells aided them in their research, and wrote about the revival.

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A Clermont twill blankie heading to London, using up the last of the indigo wool while I wait for the lye from the wood ash I’ve been soaking for the next indigo batch. One of the first indigo babes, my Ottawa gardener on the fence about basement germination or sowing straight into the ground, in the meantime this one is becoming a house plant. Found this pattern on my phone … don’t remember what or where but love either way.