Tagged: indigo

photo (2) babyindi Capture

A Clermont twill blankie heading to London, using up the last of the indigo wool while I wait for the lye from the wood ash I’ve been soaking for the next indigo batch. One of the first indigo babes, my Ottawa gardener on the fence about basement germination or sowing straight into the ground, in the meantime this one is becoming a house plant. Found this pattern on my phone … don’t remember what or where but love either way.

indigo

… and in Ottawa the first indigo test begins for a few indoor plants for study!

photo 4 (2) indgotest seashawl

So much weaving going on the dining room is now a second studio, some snips from the indgo vat and throwing some cobalt stripes into the new shawls.

 

pantsCotton and indigo-dyed plain-weave hemp leggings (mompei) with hishi zashi embroidery. Aomori Prefecture, northern Honshu. Meiji period, early twentieth century.


Wednesday

I spent a couple of ours fixing the broken warp threads in my blanket, which didn’t take as long as I had imagined. Also rigged up a skarn out of shoe boxes, knitting needles and clamps. Works a dream.

Marshfield: Part VI

I finished my blanket midday and got it off the loom, I have a load of broken threads to repair and I need to decide if I hem it or make a fringe (I am leaning towards hem).

Kate and I with my finished blanket.

I spent the rest of the afternoon weaving tape using an 18th century pattern chiefly used for upholstery. This one is linen and wool, I wove about a yard in blue and another yard in green.

Two historical blankets that I believe a future student is going to use as the basis for their blankets.


And a few shots of the dye studio … where I’ll be hopefully spending some time next August!

 

Marshfield: Part V

To my own surprise, I wove 60 inches of my blanket today. I have about 8 more inches to do to finish the last repeat of my pattern and then I get to weave some tape! Kate has one she had made for a sample warped up on a smaller loom, so I am going to finish that tomorrow. Plus I get to see more of her collection of 18th century coverlets.